Epilepsy/seizures caused by energetic deficit leading to calcium overload

Yet another study demonstrating that not only is a chronic, “incurable” disease of unknown origin treatable but that its main cause is energetic/metabolic and linked to impaired glucose metabolism. Specifically, the study demonstrated that impaired pyruvate transport into the mitochondria is sufficient to both cause new seizure activity in otherwise healthy organisms, as well as … Read more

Niacinamide + pyruvate may treat glaucoma (human study)

Some excellent results from a human clinical trial. Namely, a combination of 3g niacinamide and 3g (calcium) pyruvate daily demonstrated significant therapeutic effect in patients with already established glaucoma. I can’t access to actual study link on JAMA, but I suspect the mechanism of action is, again, improved bioenergetic state with niacinamide raising the NAD/NADH … Read more

Reduced pyruvate and/or increased lactate drive heart failure

I just did a post on the role of reduced glucose metabolism, lower pyruvate/NAM/NAD and elevated lactate in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Just minutes later, another study popped up in my newsfeed. Namely, a study that demonstrates the exact same metabolic disturbances as the main drivers of heart failure. The study below demonstrates that heart … Read more

Glaucoma likely a metabolic disease, treatable by pyruvate and/or niacinamide

About a year ago, a publication came out that demonstrated therapeutic effects of raising the (mitochondrial) NAD/NADH ratio in glaucoma patients. That study used niacinamide (NAM) and suggested that the “irreversible” changes in eye structure seen in glaucoma patients are in fact nothing more than a downstream effect of metabolic (OXPHOS) disturbances. Now, a new … Read more

Glucose is anabolic for thymus, opposes catabolic effects of cortisol

As most of my readers know, cortisol is a highly catabolic steroid and one of the main agents (estrogen being another) responsible for thymus atrophy with age. These catabolic effects of cortisol can be blocked by progesterone, DHEA, pregnenolone and even DHT (but not by testosterone). The study below confirms the catabolic effects of cortisol … Read more