Replacing starch with sucrose increases metabolism, prevent obesity

A study that will certainly generate controversy in the low-carb blogosphere, but the findings are hard to dispute. Namely, feeding a diet for 15 weeks, in which 74.3% of the calories come from carbs in the form of starch was clearly obesogenic, caused insulin resistance and elevated blood glucose, triglycerides, and free fatty acids (FFA). … Read more

Fasting ineffective for shrinking belly fat, may actually increase it

Hopefully, this study will give some serious food for thought to people who use (intermittent) fasting (IF) with the goal of losing excess weight. A recent post of mine discussed that IF is ineffective for fat loss and actually leads to loss of lean mass. The lead author of that study, himself an IF practitioner … Read more

DHT better (and safer) than testosterone for improving blood pressure, insulin levels

A great human study on the beneficial effects of androgens for a variety of metabolic biomarkers associated with insulin resistance and diabetes II. The only gripe I have with this study is that they claim it was conducted with “healthy” men when in reality all men had low plasma total testosterone (PTT), which of course … Read more

Even mainstream medicine admits many claims about sugar are myths

It is always nice to see when a outpost of mainstream medicine tries to set the record straight on something as controversial as refined sugar. My personal favorites are the myths on sugar and causal links to diabetes / cancer. Apparently, there is solid evidence those links are myths. Yet, every doctor I ever met … Read more

Stress (cortisol) as the driver of hyperglycemia in type II diabetes

To most of my readers, the title of the post may seem like something completely obvious and not deserving explanation of clarification. However, according to mainstream medicine (until now, at least) cortisol does not really have a causative role either in the development of diabetes type II or in its various manifestations such as obesity, … Read more

Endotoxin (LPS) as a cause of systemic inflammation seen in obesity

Yet another study implicating the great villain of systemic health – endotoxin / LPS. It is well-known that most people with obesity have high levels of inflammatory biomarkers both in their tissues and bloodstream. The study below demonstrates that the inflammation seen in adipose tissue of obese organisms is likely due to endotoxin / LPS. … Read more

Glycine (and leucine) can treat fatty liver (NAFLD and NASH)

A great new study that demonstrates the strong protective effects of glycine, alone or in combination with leucine, on preventing/treating various forms of fatty liver disease, as well as the obesity that often accompanies these conditions. One of the strong points of the study is that it also established a minimum daily dosage needed to … Read more

Obesity “paradox” strikes again – protection against COVID-19

I suspect this one will not go down will with the “lean is always good” crowd, which consists predominantly of members of the medical profession. Aside from all the health risks of obesity for pretty much any chronic disease, the news over the last 6 months have been replete with warning from all kinds of … Read more

Dietary fat, not carbs or protein, makes people fat

The study below adds some evidence to the debate that is has been raging for decades – i.e. just what dietary component contributes the most to weight gain. The current favorite “villain” of clinical nutrition are carbohydrates, especially their easily digestible form such as sucrose, fructose, glucose, lactose, etc. The public space is littered with … Read more

Levothyroxine (T4) monotherapy often ineffective for hypothyroidism

As most of my readers know, the currently approved therapy for hypothyroidism is levothyroxine (T4). While technically T3 and combined T4/T3 therapy are also approved by FDA, the former is only used in severe cases of myxedema and the latter is considered obsolete and a remnant of the days when the use of natural dessicated … Read more