A piece of plastic can learn through training, just like animals

The house of cards that is modern “science” continues to crumble, albeit slowly. Several years ago I made a post on the ability of an “inanimate” piece of matter (dough) to learn simple behaviors through repetitive training, akin to the widely publicized “Pavlov dog”. The dough study references an older one, performed in the 1950s … Read more A piece of plastic can learn through training, just like animals

Testosterone does NOT impair empathy in men

I am sure most readers are quite familiar with the cliche that testosterone (T) is what drives stereotypical “boy behavior” – aggressiveness, carelessness, impulsive behavior, risk taking, cheating, and of course the militaristic attitude characterized by lack of (or reduced) empathy. As I mentioned in several previous posts, most of these behaviors seem to be … Read more Testosterone does NOT impair empathy in men

The stereotypes about testosterone (T) are likely wrong

A really great study for a number of reasons. Not only does it show that the commonly cited stereotypes about T’s effects on human behavior are likely all wrong, but it also demonstrates the powerful effects the process of “pre-registering” has on study outcomes. The process of pre-registering involves the scientists submitting a priori their … Read more The stereotypes about testosterone (T) are likely wrong

Insects (wasps) are capable of logic, recognizing peer faces, and socializing based on memories

Every time I look at the title for this post I can’t help but think – so, how are wasps different from us humans? I think the answer is – not much, if at all. And this is pretty much what the study below argues, adding yet another piece to an already sizeable mountain of … Read more Insects (wasps) are capable of logic, recognizing peer faces, and socializing based on memories